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New Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience

New ideas in volition

Informations pratiques
07 février 2019
Lieu

Institut des Etudes Avancées, 17 Quai d'Anjou, 75004 Paris
Salle Dussane, ENS, 45 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris

LNC2

7-8 February 2019

Programme

The capacity for voluntary action is seen as essential to human nature. Whereas this has long preoccupied philosophers, behaviourist psychology and neuroscience have traditionally dismissed the topic as unscientific. Studying volition remains difficult, yet it is of enormous relevance to understanding human experience and to societal notions of responsibility. This symposium will bring together early-career and senior researchers across psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy, to share their new ideas and methods for a scientific investigation of the neurocognitive bases of human volition.

Organised by Nura Sidarus and Patrick Haggard.

Day 1: Thursday, 7 February, 14h – 18h30
Location: Institut d'Études Avancées, Hôtel Lauzun, 17 Quai d'Anjou, 75004 Paris

Day 2: Friday, 8 February, 9h – 13h30
Location: salle Dussane, ENS, 45 rue d’Ulm, 75005 Paris

Speakers:

Sponsors:

 

New Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience

New ideas in volition

Informations pratiques
07 février 2019
Lieu

Institut des Etudes Avancées, 17 Quai d'Anjou, 75004 Paris
Salle Dussane, ENS, 45 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris

LNC2

7-8 February 2019

 

Programme

The capacity for voluntary action is seen as essential to human nature. Whereas this has long preoccupied philosophers, behaviourist psychology and neuroscience have traditionally dismissed the topic as unscientific. Studying volition remains difficult, yet it is of enormous relevance to understanding human experience and to societal notions of responsibility. This symposium will bring together early-career and senior researchers across psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy, to share their new ideas and methods for a scientific investigation of the neurocognitive bases of human volition.

Organised by Nura Sidarus and Patrick Haggard.

Day 1: Thursday, 7 February, 14h – 18h30
Location: Institut d'Études Avancées, Hôtel Lauzun, 17 Quai d'Anjou, 75004 Paris

Day 2: Friday, 8 February, 9h – 13h30
Location: salle Dussane, ENS, 45 rue d’Ulm, 75005 Paris

Speakers:

Sponsors:

 

New Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience

New Ideas in volition

Informations pratiques
08 février 2019
Lieu

Institut des Etudes Avancées, 17 Quai d'Anjou, 75004 Paris
Salle Dussane, ENS, 45 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris

LNC2

7-8th February 2019

Programme

7th February: Afternoon session, held at the Institut des Etudes Avancées 
8th February: Morning session, held at Salle Dussane, ENS

The capacity for voluntary action is seen as essential to human nature. Whereas this has long preoccupied philosophers, behaviourist psychology and neuroscience have traditionally dismissed the topic as unscientific. Studying volition remains difficult, yet it is of enormous relevance to understanding human experience and to societal notions of responsibility. This symposium will bring together both early-career and senior researchers across psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy, to share their new ideas and methods for a scientific investigation of the neurocognitive bases of human volition.

Organisers:

  • Prof Patrick Haggard, University College London & Chaire Blaise Pascal
  • Dr Nura Sidarus, Ecole Normale Supérieure

Proposed speakers:

  • Dr Sofia Bonicalzi, LudwigMaximilians-Universität München
  • Dr Lucie Charles, University College London
  • Dr Liad Mudrik, Tel Aviv University
  • Dr Elisabeth Pacherie, Institut Jean Nicod (CNRS/EHESS/ENS)
  • Prof Eraldo Paulesu, Università degli Studi di MilanoBicocca
  • Dr Roland Pfister, Universität Würzburg
  • Dr Nura Sidarus, Ecole Normale Supérieure
  • Dr Aaron Schurger, INSERM / NeuroSpin / CEASaclay
New Ideas in Cognitive Neuroscience

New Ideas in volition

Informations pratiques
08 février 2019
Lieu

Institut des Etudes Avancées, 17 Quai d'Anjou, 75004 Paris
Salle Dussane, ENS, 45 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris

LNC2

7-8 February 2019

Programme

The capacity for voluntary action is seen as essential to human nature. Whereas this has long preoccupied philosophers, behaviourist psychology and neuroscience have traditionally dismissed the topic as unscientific. Studying volition remains difficult, yet it is of enormous relevance to understanding human experience and to societal notions of responsibility. This symposium will bring together early-career and senior researchers across psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy, to share their new ideas and methods for a scientific investigation of the neurocognitive bases of human volition.

Organised by Nura Sidarus and Patrick Haggard.

Day 1: Thursday, 7 February, 14h – 18h30
Location: Institut d'Études Avancées, Hôtel Lauzun, 17 Quai d'Anjou, 75004 Paris

Day 2: Friday, 8 February, 9h – 13h30
Location: salle Dussane, ENS, 45 rue d’Ulm, 75005 Paris

Speakers:

Sponsors:

 

Thesis defense

Tracking changes in complex auditory scenes along the cortical pathway

Intervenant(s)
Jennifer Lawlor
Informations pratiques
26 octobre 2018
2pm
Lieu

Dussane, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris

LNC2

Navigating a busy street while talking on the phone is trivial for a majority of the population. However, how the brain extracts the relevant information from the ever-changing and cluttered acoustic environment to produce the appropriate behavior remains poorly understood. The proposed thesis investigates neural basis of the extraction of relevant information in complex continuous streams for goal-directed behavior using a combination techniques linking electrophysiology to psychophysics. Humans and ferrets performed a similar change detection task that consisted of reporting changes in the underlying statistics of a tone cloud. The brain electrical activity was recorded (scalp level for humans and cell level for ferrets) while subjects engaged in the task. Overall, we find area-specific cortical responses: change-related responses are generalized along the cortical pathway. In addition, task engagement strongly modulates the frontal cortex where decision-related responses are found.

Jury: 

- Stephen David, OHSU, Rapporteur, Président du jury
- Andrew King, Oxford University, Rapporteur
- Kishore Kuchibhotla, Johns Hopkins University, Membre du jury
- Srdjan Ostojic, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Membre du jury